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Useful weblinks: War With Troy, Episode 9

Back to the Battlefield / Achilles goes in Search of Hector
Achilles Grieves over dead Patroclus 1
    Painting of 1760-63 by Gavin Hamilton in the National Museums of Scotland, Edinburgh.
Achilles Grieves over dead Patroclus 2
    1855 picture by Nikolai Ge, a famous Russian realist painter. In the Art Museum of Belarus, Minsk, Belarus.
Achilles Grieves over dead Patroclus 3
    1956 picture by French illustrators Alice and Martin Provensen.
Achilles Grieves over dead Patroclus 4
    Achilles, in red, receives the dead body of his close friend Patroclus.
1986 painting by American David Ligare; in a private collection.
The Horses of Achilles
    In ancient sources (Homer, Apollodorus) Achilles only has two horses - called Balius and Xanthus ("Dapple" and "Bay"). It's only at this point in the legends that Xanthus speaks (Iliad 19.408-417). The horses were born of the West Wind and immortal.
Painted c.1700 in the style of Anthony Van Dyck; in the National Gallery, London.
Achilles in his New Armour charges out
    ... and turns the River Scamander red with slaughter.
Fabulous illustration by Alan Lee.
King Priam and the Trojans watch from the walls
    Illustration from 1956 by Alice and Martin Provensen.
Achilles chases Hector around Troy 1
    Illustration from 1956 by Alice and Martin Provensen.
Achilles chases Hector around Troy 2
    Three times they ran around the walls of Troy...
Illustration by Victor Ambrus, 1997.
Classical sources for the above section:
> Homer, Iliad 18.343-353; 19.1-20, 365ff; 21; 22.1-208.
 
Hector's Fate in the Balance
Achilles versus Hector 1
    Famous Greek vase-painting of the duel. This scene, showing the two heroes in heroic nudity, is a detail from a large bowl (known as a krater) used for mixing wine and water.
In this image of the whole vase, you can see Athene standing behind Achilles urging him on, while behind Hector, the god Apollo walks away symbolically leaving the Trojan to his fate.
Made in Athens about 500-480 BC; now in the British Museum.
Achilles versus Hector 2
    "Achilles Slays Hector", by Peter Paul Rubens, 1630-1635.
Achilles versus Hector 3
    Golden-haired Achilles about to finish off Hector.
Illustration from 1962 by Rene Peron.
Achilles versus Hector 4
    2004 movie Troy pits Brad Pitt as Achilles against Eric Bana as Hector.
Classical sources for the above section:
> Homer, Iliad 22.209-363.
 
A Friend Honoured / Achilles lays Patroclus to Rest
Achilles drags the body of Hector 1: Greek vase
    Greek black-figure vase made around 510 BC depicting Achilles tying the body of Hector to his chariot.
In the Hermitage Museum, St Petersburg, Russia.
Achilles drags the body of Hector 2: Roman mosaic
    Roman mosaic in the Vatican Museum.
Achilles Drags the body of Hector 3: 1960's drawing
    Illustration by Rene Peron, 1962.
Achilles Drags the body of Hector 4: 1980's drawing
    Illustration by Peter Connolly, 1986.
One of the most common images of the Trojan War is that of Achilles dragging the body of Hector behind his chariot.
While the number three is often used by Homer (e.g. Achilles chases Hector three times around the walls of Troy; Achilles drags Hector's body three times around Patroclus' funeral pyre), in this instance Homer does not say Achilles dragged the body three times around the walls of Troy - merely that Achilles dragged the body back to the Greek camp (Iliad 22.395-404).
It is, in fact, the Roman poet Virgil (some 700 years after Homer) who seems to be the first to write that Achilles dragged Hector three times around the walls of Troy (Aeneid 1.483).
The Funeral of Patroclus
    The most famous painting of this episode is by the renowned French neo-classical artist Jacques-Louis David.
Painted in 1778 and entitled "The Funeral of Patroclus" this detail shows Achilles grieving over Patroclus' body, while Hector still lies tied to Achilles' chariot. The wooden funeral pyre towers up behind with sacrificed Trojans being piled up on it.
In the National Gallery of Ireland.
Contrary to the narrative in War With Troy, Homer (Iliad 23.184-5) actually states that Aphrodite kept the dogs off the body of Hector.
The Funeral of Patroclus... or is it?
    A body burns atop a pyre and a lone man grieves beside it? It could almost be Achilles mourning Patroclus... except it isn't because it's in a galaxy far, far away...
Here's the video answer.
Classical sources for the above section:
> Homer, Iliad 22.395-404; 23.1-256

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